In cooperation with

The Association for Computing Machinery
Special Interest Group on Computer Science Education
Presents


Eighth Annual
Consortium for Computing
Sciences in Colleges
Northeastern Conference

Hosted by

Rhode Island College

April 25 - 26, 2003 
Providence, RI

Statement of Purpose

The CCSCNE brings together faculty, staff, and students from academic institutions throughout the Northeast for exchange of ideas and information concerning undergraduate computing education.



Schedule
Friday, April 25:
Programming Contest --  Workshops
Welcome -- Plenary Session 1
Concurrent Session 1  -- Concurrent Session 2
Posters -- Banquet

Saturday, April 26:
Breakfast
Concurrent Session 3 -- Plenary Session II
Concurrent Session 4
Concurrent Session 5 -- Lunch


A Note from the Conference Co-Chairs

Welcome to the 8th Annual CCSC Northeastern Conference.  In the name of all the members of the conference committee and the members of the Board of the Northeastern region, we welcome you to our Spring extravaganza.  These people have had two long planning meetings and have exchanged more emails than you want to know about and the result is this conference.  Our aim is to present you with ideas that will help you teach computer sciences, to provide you with panels that will provoke you to talk about teaching, to give you hands-on experience in methods others have used to teach, and to provide your students with a chance to show their work.  In short, we are about teaching.  We hope and expect that you will find something here to change your teaching.

Also, welcome to Providence and to Rhode Island College.  Despite the budget constraints that are part of being a state college in the current fiscal mess, the dedicated faculty of Rhode Island College’s Department of Mathematics and Computer Science have been able to host this conference.  Enjoy our campus and, if you get a chance, visit the restaurants of Federal Hill and Downtown Providence and enjoy the ambience of our well-preserved colonial heritage.

And when you leave, resolve to come to the next CCSCNE at Union College in New York.  And next time, plan to speak or to sponsor student posters or a programming team.  We need you.

Frank Ford and Rod Rodrigues
CCSCNE-2003 Conference Co- Chairs
 
 



2003 Conference Committee

Conference                               confchair@ccscne.org
Frank Ford, Providence College  (401) 865-2635
Rod Rodrigues, Rhode Island College  (401) 456-9672

Papers                                      papers@ccscne.org
Karl Wurst, Worcester State College  (508) 929-8728
Lawrence D’Antonio, Ramapo College of NJ  (201) 684–7714
Hemant Pendharkar, Worcester State College  (508) 929-8969

Undergraduate Posters           posters@ccscne.org
Michael Gousie, Wheaton College (508) 286-3969 

Panels/Tutorials/Workshops    panels@ccscne.org
                                                 tutorials@ccscne.org 
                                                 workshops@ccscne.org
Roger Simons, Rhode Island College  (401) 456-9865
Dale Fish (508) 929-8136

Speakers                                 speakers@ccscne.org
Mary Russell, Providence College   (401) 865-2630

Publicity                                  publicity@ccscne.org
Frank Ford, Providence College    (401) 865-2635
Charles Welty, Univ. of Southern Maine   (207) 780-4240

Vendors                                  vendors@ccscne.org
Bill Taffe, Plymouth State College  (603) 535-2530
Paul Chiasson, Worcester State College  (508) 929-8560

Registration                           registration@ccscne.org
Ying Zhou, Rhode Island College  (401) 456-9759
Ann Moskol, Rhode Island College (401) 345-9761

Programming Contest            pgmcontest@ccscne.org
Tim Huang, Middlebury College   (802) 443-2431
Jim Schaefer, Rhode Island College (401) 456-9758

Local Arrangements              local@ccscne.org
Kate Sanders, Rhode Island College    (401) 456-9634
Pat Hays, Rhode Island College  (401) 456-8803


SPONSORS

We gratefully acknowledge these sponsors who have helped make this conference possible:

Microsoft Corporation for a grant to help defray the costs of providing an affordable conference at the regional level, for its support of the Programming Contest, and for special support of the poster contest session.

Upsilon Pi Epsilon for its support of the student poster contest.

Course Technology  and  Turing’s Craft for support of the coffee breaks.
 
 

VENDORS

Please visit our vendors.  Their purchase of exhibition space is important to the financial health of our conference and the services and products they are presenting should be interesting to many attendees.
 
 
Company URL
Apple Computer http://www.apple.com/education/compsci
Charles River Media  http://www.charlesriver.com
Computational Science Institute 
Course Technology http://www.course.com
InterSystems Caché Campus http://www.cachecampus.com
John Wiley & Sons http://www.wiley.com
Jones and Bartlett http://computerscience.jbpub.com
McGraw-Hill  http://www.mhhe.com
Metrowerks http://www.metrowerks.com
Microsoft  http://www.microsoft.com
Prentice Hall  http://www.prenhall.com
Turing’s Craft http://www.turingscraft.com

Special Vendor Presentations

Our vendors will present two special sessions.  We hope that you will find these informative.

Friday, April 25, noon – 12:45: Apple Presentation
Mac OS X: The Ultimate Java Platform

President’s Dining Room, Donovan Dining Center
Matt MacInnis, Higher Education Marketing Manager for Computer Science
(Pizza will be provided by Apple.)

With Java now firmly established as a popular language for Computer Science education, Mac OS X brings capabilities to the Computer Science community never before available on any platform. Put simply, Mac OS X, with its integrated Java development environment, is the best platform for developing and teaching with Java.

The unique way in which Java is integrated into the operating system brings unparalleled ease-of-development, tool integration, and performance on Mac OS X. We will discuss these benefits and explore the details behind the implementation of Java on Mac OS X, including the Aqua look-and-feel as well as the Apple-innovated shared VM technology. We'll briefly touch upon the tools that Apple and third parties provide to make Java easy to develop and use on Mac OS X. 

Friday, April 25, 2:15 – 3:15: Microsoft Presentation
An Introduction to Visual Studio .NET 2003

President’s Dining Room, Donovan Dining Center
Marcin Krieger, Microsoft

Visual Studio 2003 consists of a variety of improvements and extensions to VS.NET.  You will learn about the new features and functionality in VB.NET 2003.  This 'hands-on' presentation will step through code, use VB.NET, C#, J#, as well as mobile controls and mobile device application development.


PROGRAMMING CONTEST

Team Advisor Team Advisor
Brooklyn College  Danny Kopec Rhode Island College  Pat Hays
Colby College  Marc Smith Smith College Judy A. Franklin
Connecticut College 1  Gary Parker St. Anselm College  Ali Rafieymehr
Connecticut College 2 Gary Parker St. John Fisher College Gerry Wildenberg
Dickinson College Grant Braught St. Mary's College of Maryland Simon Read
Fairfield University Edward J. O'Neill SUNY Fredonia Ziya Arnavut
Iona College John S. Mallozzi SUNY Oneonta 1 Don Allison
Manhattan College 1  Carol Hurwitz SUNY Oneonta 2 Don Allison
Manhattan College 2  Carol Hurwitz SUNY Plattsburgh Stephen Paul Linder
Middlebury College Frank Swenton SUNY Potsdam  Barbara Nostrand
Pace University 1  Narayan Murthy University of
Hartford 1 
Ingrid Russell
Pace University 2 Narayan Murthy University of 
Hartford 2 
Ingrid Russell
Providence College 1  Mary Russell University of Maine at Farmington Russell Rainville
Providence College 2 Mary Russell University of Scranton Robert McCloskey
Quinnipiac University David Herscovici Vassar College Brad Richards
Ramapo College of New Jersey Amruth Kumar Wellesley College 1  Franklyn Turbak
Wellesley College 2  Franklyn Turbak
Worcester State College Dale Fish



Paper Reviewers


Name School Name  School
Brian Adams Franklin & Marshall College Mark LeBlanc Wheaton College
Don Allison SUNY College at Oneonta David Levine St. Bonaventure University
George Antoniou Montclair State University Aparna Mahadev Worcester State College
Ziya Arnavut SUNY Fredonia Scott McElfresh Carnegie Mellon University
Frances Bailie Iona College Jeanine Meyer Purchase College
Norman Bashias Manhattanville College Robert Noonan College of William & Mary
Jonathan Blake Quinnipiac University Edward O'Neill Fairfield University
Douglas Blank Bryn Mawr College Eileen Peluso
Hassan 
Lycoming College
Mary Courtney Pace University Pournaghshband Southern Polytechnic State University
Ellen Dauwer La Salle University Catherine Ricardo Iona College
Peter Drexel Plymouth State College Ingrid Russell University of Hartford
Michael L. Gargano Pace University Joel Silverberg  Roger Williams University
Stephen Hartley Rowan University Evelyn Stiller Plymouth State College
Mark Hoffman Quinnipiac University William Taffe Plymouth State College
Donald Hsu Dominican College Goran Trajkovski Towson University
Carol Huie Hostos Community College John Trono Saint Michael's College
Chih-Cheng Hung  Southern  Polytechnic State University John Vaughn Hobart and William Smith Colleges
Scott Hunter Siena College Ellen Walker Hiram College
Lubomir Ivanov Iona College Richard Wyatt West Chester University
Danny Kopec Brooklyn College Marsha Zaidman Mary Washington College



Friday, April 25, 2003
Programming Contest Results

PROGRAMMING CONTEST ..................................................8:00 a.m.-12:45 p.m.
                                                          (Co-Sponsored by Microsoft)
     Breakfast ........................................................................................8:00 a.m.-8:45 a.m

South Dining Room, Donovan Dining Center
     Computers Available for Teams to Practice ..................................8:00 a.m.-8:45 a.m.
Computer Lab, Horace Mann Hall
     Initial Meeting and Presentation of the Problems ...........................8:45 a.m.-9:00 a.m.
Computer Lab, Horace Mann Hall
     Contest Time ......................................................................................9:00 a.m.- Noon
Computer Lab, Horace Mann Hall
     Luncheon for Teams ..........................................................................Noon-12:45 p.m.
Donovan Dining Center
     Participating teams

REGISTRATION .............................................................................8:30 a.m.-5:00 p.m.

Main Floor, Donovan Dining Center

PRE-CONFERENCE WORKSHOPS ............................................9:00 a.m.- Noon

Creating Interactive Course Material Using Adobe Acrobat’s PDF

Jonathon Blake, Quinnipiac University, CT
Pattie Belle Hastings, Quinnipiac University, CT
 (See description later in program.)
Room 163, Gaige Hall
Use Case Modeling
Donald R. Chand, Bentley College, MA
Sri Vasudevan, Bentley College, MA
 (See description later in program.)
Room 168, Gaige Hall
Although the workshops are free and open to all, potential attendees must pre-register by contacting Roger Simons (RSimons@ric.edu).  As attendance will be limited, attendees will be notified that they have been admitted.
 
 

VENDOR DISPLAYS ..................................................................10:00 a.m.-6:30 p.m.

Main Floor, Donovan Dining Center

WELCOME ................................................................................1:00 p.m.-1:15 p.m.

Auditorium, Gaige Hall
Greetings from 
    John Nazarian, President of Rhode Island College
     Rod Rodrigues, Conference Co-Chair, Rhode Island College
 

PLENARY SESSION I ..............................................................1:15 p.m.-2:15 p.m.

Auditorium, Gaige Hall
How to Beat Children at Their Own Games
John H. Conway, John von Neumann Distinguished Professor of Mathematics, Princeton University, Fellow of the Royal Society, Member, A.A.A.S. 
(See abstract and speaker information later in program.)
 

BREAK .........................................................................................2:15 p.m.-3:00 p.m.

South Dining Room, Donovan Dining Center

CONCURRENT SESSION 1 ................................................. 3:15 p.m.-4:30 p.m.

Session 1A:Papers: Architecture

President’s Dining Room, Donovan Dining Center
Enhancing Pedagogy via eBay - Some Assembly (Language) Required
    Scott Hunter, Sienna College, NY
An Object Framework for Teaching ALU Component Design in Architecture Courses
   G. Sampath, The College of New Jersey, NJ
   Norman Neff, The College of New Jersey, NJ
An Application With Variations As Used In Teaching A Palm Programming Course
   W. Douglas Maurer, George Washington University, DC

Session 1B: Papers: Computer Science I/II

Room 193, Horace Mann Hall
The Effect of Closed Labs in Computer Science I: An Assessment
   Amruth Kumar, Ramapo College of New Jersey, NJ
Pair Programming and Frequent Pair Trading: Effects on Learning and Motivation in a CS2 Course
    Tim DeClue, Southwest Baptist University, MO
It’s All Writing: Experience Using Rewriting to Learn in Introductory Computer Science
 Brian Ladd, St. Lawrence University, NY

Session 1C: Panel

Room 191, Horace Mann Hall
Condensing the CC-2001 Core in an Integrated Curriculum
    Ingrid Russell, University of Hartford, CT
    Michael Georgiopoulos, University of Central Florida, FL
    Jose Castro, University of Central Florida, FL
    Todd Neller, Gettysburg College, PA
    Daniel McCracken, City College of New York, NY
    Laurie King, College of the Holy Cross, MA
    Dennis Bouvier, Saint Louis University, MO

Session 1D: Tutorial

Room 192, Horace Mann Hall
Introductory Computer Science with Focus on Program Design
   Stephen Bloch, Adelphi University, NY
   Kathi Fisler, Worcester Polytechnic Institute, MA
   Viera K. Proulx, Northeastern University, MA

BREAK .............................................................................................4:30 p.m.-4:45 p.m.

South Dining Room, Donovan Dining Center

CONCURRENT SESSION 2...................................................... 4:45 p.m.-6:00 p.m.

Session 2A: Papers: Bioinformatics

Room 191, Horace Mann Hall
Genome Generator: Simulating the Development of Junk DNA
   Robert McGrail, Bard College, NY
   Rebecca Thomas, Bard College, NY
   Michael Tibbets, Bard College, NY
Teaching together: a three-year case study in genomics
   Michael LeBlanc, Wheaton College, MA
   Betsey Dyer, Wheaton College, MA
Session 2B:Papers: Functional Programming
Room 192, Horace Mann Hall
Teaching Linked Lists and Recursion without Conditionals or Null
   Stephen Bloch, Adelphi University, NY
Understanding Functional Programming 
   Richard Wyatt, West Chester University, PA

Session 2C: Panel

Room 193, Horace Mann Hall
Implementing the Architecture, Assembly Language, and Operating Systems Components of Curriculum 2001
   Frank Ford, Providence College, RI
   Michael Gousie, Wheaton College, MA
   Amruth Kumar, Ramapo College, NJ
   Adbul Sattar, Bridgewater State College, MA
   Linda Wilkens, Providence College, RI

Session 2D:Tutorial

Room 182, Horace Mann Hall
Modeling as an Interactive Learning Environment: Inquiry-based Strategies for the Undergraduate Classroom
Robert M. Panoff, The Shodor Education Foundation, Inc., NC
 
 

STUDENT POSTERS/SOCIAL HOUR ............... ...................... 6:00 p.m.- 7:00 p.m.

Balcony, Donovan Dining Center
    The list of posters, poster presenters, and their advisors is listed at the bottom of the page.

BANQUET ......................................................................................7:00 p.m.-9:00 p.m.

Donovan Dining Center
Winners of the Programming Contest and Student Poster Session will be announced at the banquet.

Saturday, April 26, 2003

CONTINENTAL BREAKFAST............................................... 7:30 a.m.-8:30 a.m.

South Dining Room, Donovan Dining Center

REGISTRATION .........................................................................8:00 a.m.-10:00 a.m.

Main Floor, Donovan Dining Center

VENDOR DISPLAYS  .................................................................8:00 a.m.-10:30 a.m.

Main Floor, Donovan Dining Center

CONCURRENT SESSION 3.................................................... 8:30 a.m.-9:45 a.m.

Session 3A: Papers: Extra-Course Topics

Room 191, Horace Mann Hall
Multidisciplinary Teams to Fulfill URI CS Internship Requirements at GTECH
   Joan Peckham, University of Rhode Island, RI
Overcoming Undergraduate Research at a Small Institution
   Jennifer Polack-Wahl., Mary Washington College, VA
   Peter Squire, Naval Surface Warfare Center Dahlgren Division, VA
An Alternative Recruitment Source
   Joanne Sexton, Augusta State University, GA

Session 3B:  Papers:  Data Structures

Room 192, Horace Mann Hall
Encapsulating Binary Tree Traversal: A Design Exercise
   John Mallozzi, Iona College, NY
Coding in tongues: a bilingual programming perspective to data structures
   Brian Tjaden, University of Washington, WA
   Hannah Tang, University of Washington, WA
(In)formalism
   Jack Beidler, University of Scranton, PA
   Robert McCloskey, University of Scranton, PA
   Yaodong Bi, University of Scranton, PA

Session 3C: Panel

President’s Dining Room, Donovan Dining Hall
New Faculty Contributions Toward Enhancing Diversity
   Goran Trajkovski, Towson University, MD
   Alfreda Dudley-Sponaugle, Towson University, MD
   Elizabeth Goode, Towson University, MD 
   Cheryl Schroeder-Thomas, Towson University, MD

Session 3D: Tutorial

Room 193, Horace Mann Hall
Making the Most of NSF Funding Opportunities
   Jane Prey, National Science Foundation
   Harriet Taylor, National Science Foundation
 

PLENARY SESSION II ...........................................................  9:50 a.m.-10:50 a.m.

Auditorium, Gaige Hall
Multimedia in the Computer Science Classroom:  Visualizing, Animating, and Conceptualizing
     Linda Stern, University of Melbourne, Australia
     (See abstract and speaker information later in program.)

BREAK........................................................................................... 10:50 a.m.-11:15 a.m.

South Dining Room, Donovan Dining Center

CONCURRENT SESSION 4..................................................... 11:15 a.m.-12:30 p.m.

Session 4A: Papers: Projects

Room 191, Horace Mann Hall
The Challenges of Designing Lab Exercises for a Curriculum in Computer Security
   Rahul Tikekar, Southern Oregon University, OR
   Tom Bacon, Southern Oregon University, OR
A Parser Project in a Programming Languages Course
   Michael Werner, Wentworth Institute of Technology, MA
Napolean’s Soldiers
   Goran Trajkovski, Towson University, MD
   Elizabeth Goode, Towson University, MD

Session 4B: Papers: Curriculum

Room 193, Horace Mann Hall
Creating Computer Science Curricula for the New Millenium
   Evelyn Stiller, Plymouth State College, NH
   Cathie LeBlanc, Plymouth State College, NH
From University Wide Outcomes to Course Embedded Assessment of CS1
   Deborah Whitfield, Slippery Rock University, PA
Computer Literacy: Today and Tomorrow
   Mark Hoffman, Quinnipiac University, CT
   Jonathan Blake, Quinnipiac University, CT

Session 4C: Panel

Room 192, Horace Mann Hall
Teaching CS Courses Online
   Ngaraj Rao, Mercy College, NY
   Irena Pevac, Central Connecticut College, CT
   Narayan Murthy, Pace University, NY
   Steven D’Alessio, Iona College, NY
   Mary Courtney, Pace University, NY

Session 4D: Tutorial

Room 182, Horace Mann Hall
Effective Use of the Algorithms in Action Website
   Mary Russell, Providence College, RI
   Linda Stern, University of Melbourne, Australia
   Jeff Richardson, Providence College, RI
   Eric Ruggieri, Providence College, RI
   Chris Severino, Providence College, RI
 

LUNCH .........................................................................................12:45 p.m.-2:00 p.m.

Donovan Dining Center

MEMBERSHIP MEETING.............................................................. 2:00 p.m.-2:30 p.m.

President’s Dining Room, Donovan Dining Center

BOARD MEETING .......................................................................... 2:30 p.m.-4:00 p.m.

President’s Dining Room, Donovan Dining Center



 
STUDENT POSTERS

Friday 5:30 - 6:30 p.m.
Main Floor, Donovan Dining Center
(Co-Sponsored by UPE)

Building a Virtual World with Text: The Coolest MUD Ever
  Kevin Radloff, Colby College 
  Advisor: Clare Bates Congdon 
Maps You Don't Have to Fold: an interactive map of the RIC campus
  Jason Rindge, Rhode Island College
  Advisor: Kathryn Sanders
Online Linux Tutorial
  Bret E. Shaw, Union College
  Advisor: Chris 
3-Dimensional Databases for Real-time Visual Simulation
  Kevin Smith, St. Mary’s College of Maryland
  Advisor: Simon Read
The Effect of Genetic Algorithms on Maze-Solving Efficiency of a Simulated Robot
  Chris Sotzing, Colby College 
  Advisor: Clare Bates Congdon 
ProofWorx: A Pedagogical Tool for Proof
  Craig Stevenson, St. Mary’s College of Maryland
  Advisor: Simon Read
Searching DNA Neighborhoods
  Adam H. Villa, Wheaton College
  Advisor: Mark D. LeBlanc
Effects of Learning on Co-evolution
  Rebecca Wells, Dickinson College
  Advisor: Grant Braught 
Generating 3D Model Data from an Object
  Brian Wenzel, State University of New York College at Oneonta 
  Advisor: Don Allison
Automated Server Testing
  Bobby Syed, Union College
  Advisor: Chris Fernandes
From Genes to Queens: A "Crafty" Approach to Genetically Evolve a Chess Engine
  Marc Attiyeh, Colby College
  Skyler Place, Colby College
  Advisor: Clare Bates Congdon
Comparisons of Speed Enhancements in Fractals
  Adam Finn Nogaj, State University of New York College
  Rebecca Lindstrom, State University of New York College 
  Advisor: Reneta Barneva 
Parallel Computer Generated Holography
  Stanislav Miroshnikov, Manhattan College
  Jason Grigsby, Birmingham-Southern College
  Advisors: David E. Maharray, Wabash College
                  Corey Kovacs,DePauw University
Giving a Robot Artificial Intelligence
  Christie Mendonca, Mount Saint Mary College
  Craig Henrie, Mount Saint Mary College
  Advisor: Vincent Kayes
The Superficial Algorithmitis, Blind Spot, and Memory vs. CPU: Software Performance Antipatterns
  James McKenna. Stonehill College
  Advisor: Bob Dugan
Using Regular Expressions to Locate Putative Zinc Finger Binding Sites
  Stephen Benz, Wheaton College
  Jonah Cool, Wheaton College 
  Advisors: Mark D. LeBlanc
      Betsey Dyer
Finding the Noise in Relativistic Particle Physics using Autoclass
  Evan P. McGee,Colby College 
  Kristoffer S. Lee, Colby College 
  Advisor: Clare Bates Congdon 
Evolving Robot Behavior to Play Hide and Seek
  Katelyn Mann,Colby College 
  Advisor: Clare Bates Congdon 
Investigating Teams of Agents for RoboCup Soccer
  Thomas Karl Mace, Colby College 
  Advisor: Randolph M. Jones 
Virtual Driving Simulator Project
  Ryan Lurvey, Saint Anselm College 
  Advisor: Carol Traynor 
Reusable XML Designs - FSM Generator
  Ryan Laytham, State Univerity of New York at Oneonta 
  Advisor: James Ryder 
Dynamic Correlation: The Effect of Learning on Evolution when Learning and Evolutionary Tasks Are Different
  Adam Labadorf, Dickinson College 
  Advisor: Grant Braught 
A Searchable Herb Database
  Blair Kitchen, St. Mary's College of Maryland 
  Advisor: Simon Read 
Clay: Synchronous Collaborative Interactive Environment
  Robert Hutzel, St. Mary's College of Maryland 
  Maciej Nowacki, St. Mary's College of Maryland 
  Advisor: Ursula Wolz 
Experiencing the Design and Beauty of a Recursive Algorithm for a Koch Curve Fractal
  Nathan Howard, Eastern Connecticut State University 
  Advisor: C. Gary Rommel 
Analyzing Website Structure
  James David Hoy, Slippery Rock University 
  William Kammermeier, Slippery Rock University 
  James M. Brahm, Slippery Rock University 
  Advisors: Paul Mullins 
   Deborah Whitfield 
Modern Computer Science and Architecture in Designing and Constructing a Robot
  Christopher Hagis, Wagner College 
  Thomas Sheeran, Wagner College 
  Advisor: Adrian Ionescu 
Assessing Network Security
  Joshua B. Green, State University of New York at Oneonta
  Advisor: James Ryder 
Design and Implementation of Interactive Tutorials focused on Sorting and Data Structures
  Ross Gore, University of Richmond 
  Advisor: Lewis Barnett 
Parallel Genetic Algorithms: An Exploration of Weather Prediction through Clustered Computing
  Emily Gibson, 
  Jessie Burger, The College of New Jersey 
  Advisor: Deborah Knox 
The nswap Module for Network Swap
  Sean Finney, Swarthmore College 
  Kuzman Ganchev, Swarthmore College
  Matti Klock, Swarthmore College
  Michael Spiegel, Swarthmore College
  Advisor: Tia Newhall 
Polygon Placement Algorithms for Convex Polygon and Simple Polygon
  Jiaxin Fu, Middlebury College 
  Advisor: Matthew Dickerson 
The Effect of Learning on the "Influence of Chance, History, and Adaptation" in Artificial Evolution
  Ashley Charles Dean, Dickinson College
  Advisor: Grant Braught
An Investigation of Computer Generated Crossword Puzzles
  Rashid Ali, Providence College 
  Brian Black, Providence College 
  Jeffery Spiro, Providence College 
  Advisor: Richard Connelly
Neural Networks: A Study in Digit Pattern Classification
  Jay Combs, Colby College
  Kevin Septor, Colby College
  Advisor: Clare Bates Congdon 
Dynamic Labs using a Modular Configuration
  Rob Andleman, Clarion University of Pennsylvania
  Jason Gruver, Clarion University of Pennsylvania
  Matt Smith, Clarion University of Pennsylvania
  Maria Pirazzi, Clarion University of Pennsylvania
  Lisa Wilson, Clarion University of Pennsylvania
  Abby Kimmel, Clarion University of Pennsylvania
  Advisor: Dana E. Madison 
Web Accessibility
  Maria Chrisohoidis, The College of New Jersey
  Olivia Ying, The College of New Jersey
  Advisor: Deborah Knox 
A Symbolic Computation System
  Tianran Chen, Western Connecticut State University
  Advisor: G. Ganchev 
Extending CSP with Parallel Events
  Kyle Burke, Colby College
  Advisor: Marc Smith 
Application of Machine Learning Techniques to Improving Web Search Results
  Jessie Burger, 
  Aaron Archer Waterman, The College of New Jersey 
  Advisor: Ursula Wolz 
Eye Music: Creating Music by Viewing Art
  Jeanne Stern, Connecticut College 
  Advisor: Bridget Baird 
Implementing the IEEE 802.11 Wireless Standard on Cybiko Toys
  Benjamin Stull, Vassar College 
  Advisor: Brad Richards 
Evolving Boids: Incorporating Machine Learning into Artificial Life 
   Adam Birt, Colby College
   Samuel Shaw, Colby College 
   Advisor: Clare Bates Congdon 
Microsoft.net: Understanding the .net Framework and Developing Applications using .net
    Andrew Fairbanks, Providence College 
    Justin LeCam, Providence College 
    Tyler McCabe, Providence College 
    Advisor: Linda Wilkens 


Description of Pre-Conference Workshops
Friday, 9:00 a.m. –noon

Creating Interactive Course Material Using Adobe Acrobat’s PDF
  Jonathon Blake, Quinnipiac University, CT
  Pattie Belle Hastings, Quinnipiac University, CT

Description
This will be an active workshop, with participants working on computers using Adobe Acrobat 5. The first part of this workshop will discuss how to generate PDFs using tools available in Microsoft Windows, MacOS, and flavors of the Unix operating system. We will cover techniques for generating PDFs from a variety of sources that result in attractively formatted documents whether viewed on the screen or printed. The majority of our time, however, will be spent introducing Adobe Acrobat 5 (available for both the Windows and Mac platforms).  What Acrobat does is provide an author with the ability to add a full suite of user interface widgets to a PDF. Each of these elements can have Javascript attached to it. Furthermore, these scripts can access each other, providing yet another level of interactivity. In addition to the user interface elements, it is also possible to attach Javascript code to pages of the document, as well as the document itself. All of these scripts can be triggered by any one of a number of events at a variety of levels. Adobe Acrobat provides us with a way to produce simple, interactive documents that serve as excellent interactive teaching tools. Furthermore, these tools are readily available to the students because of the ubiquitous nature of Acrobat Reader.

Presenters
Pattie Belle Hastings is an artist, an author, and an educator. She is an Assistant Professor of Interactive Digital Design at Quinnipiac University in Hamden, CT. She has taught art and design for more than a decade in courses and workshops, and is co-owner with her husband of a design studio in New Haven, CT. She has taught many workshops on PDFs and interactivity, and is an Acrobat 5 Adobe Certified Expert. She is an active participant in the international PDF developer community, and is co-author of Adobe Acrobat 5 Master Class: Interactivity & Multimedia for PDF. She also has extensive experience developing interactive PDFs as a teaching tool (http://www.designu.org/~zen/).
Jonathan Blake is an Associate Professor of Computer Science at Quinnipiac University in Hamden, CT. He has been teaching Computer Science for more than 13 years, covering classes from Computer Literacy to Software Engineering, and from Introductory Programming to Artificial Intelligence. A strong advocate of the use of technology to foster active learning, he has augmented many courses using Web-based course management tools and is in the process of developing a suite of interactive PDFs to support concepts taught in the CS1/CS2 sequence.

Use Case Modeling
  Donald R. Chand, Bentley College, MA
  Sri Vasudevan, Bentley College, MA

Description
The Use Case approach, invented by Jacobsen [1], is becoming the preferred approach for requirements modeling and systems development. Some of the reasons for the popularity of use cases for requirements modeling are: (1) Use cases are built on very simple and understandable primitives that enable effective communication with the user but are at the same time precise enough for the analyst to correctly capture requirements and communicate them to the developers; (2) Use cases are part of the unified modeling language (UML), which is widely adopted as the industry standard for object-oriented systems engineering; (3) Use cases provide a natural and integrated input to object modeling, interface specification and object testing; (4) The evolution of Web-based, network-centric information technology has dramatically altered the functionality and complexity of traditional business applications, and compared to data flow diagrams, the use cases are more effective in capturing the complex and dynamic requirements of Web-enabled applications. 
The objective of this workshop is to teach Use Case modeling and bring out the issues that make use case modeling a rich and deep area of study. The approach taken is illustrative.  That is, practical applications will be used to introduce the key concepts and basic issues in use case modeling.

Presenters
Don Chand’s teaching and research interests are in the areas of systems analysis and design, software project management, software process management and advanced design methodologies. Dr. Chand has published extensively and his articles have appeared in such flagship journals as the Communications of the ACM, Journal of ACM, IEEE Software, and the Journal of Management Systems.  He has been a keynote speaker at regional, national and international conferences.  He served as associate editor of the Journal of Information Technology Management and on the editorial board of the Journal of Information Systems Education. He has been an ACM lecturer, computer science program evaluator for CSAB (Computer Science Accreditation Board), and professional development lecturer in advanced design methodologies for both ACM and IEEE.
 Sri Vasudevan’s teaching and research interests are in the areas of eBusiness system architectures, application design and implementation, distributed system architecture and technologies like J2EE, Java, C++ and CORBA. Dr. Vasudevan has extensive industry experience in Information Technology and he has taught in the corporate environment for several companies inclusing IBM, Sun, Citicorp and Sprint. He has led several technical seminars on a worldwide basis in topics like CORBA, Websphere, OOA&D and Use Cases. He is the creator of several software titles and web sites including www.yourpace.com and elrond.bentley.edu.



 
Description of Invited Speaker Presentations

PLENARY SESSION I ..................................................................1:15 p.m.-2:15 p.m.

Auditorium, Gaige Hall

How to Beat Children at Their Own Games

John H. Conway, John von Neumann Distinguished Professor of Mathematics, Princeton University, Fellow of the Royal Society, Member, A.A.A.S.
Abstract
Some children’s games are a lot harder than you might think!  I’ll describe some mathematics that makes them easier, but not entirely trivial.

Presenter
World-famous mathematician John Horton Conway is the author or co-author of at least ten books, and many expository articles which have had substantial impact not just on research mathematicians but on mathematical amateurs as well. Conway has a rare gift for naming mathematical objects, and for inventing useful mathematical notations. His joy in mathematics is clearly evident in all that he writes.

Educated at the University of Cambridge, Conway got a job at Cambridge as a mathematical logician upon graduation. He taught at his alma mater for many years before joining the Princeton faculty in 1986, and remains an honorary fellow of Gonville and Caius College.  He is the recipient of numerous distinguished awards:

•  Berwick Prize, London Mathematical Society, 1971
•  Polya Prize, London Mathematical Society, 1987
•  Frederic Esser Nemmers Prize, 1999
•  Leroy P. Steele Prize, American Mathematical Society, 2000
•  Joseph Priestley Award, 200 
• Conway received an honorary Dsc. from the University of Liverpool (his         hometown) on July 4, 2001.


PLENARY SESSION II ....................................................................9:50 a.m.-10:50 a.m.

Auditorium, Gaige Hall
Multimedia in the Computer Science Classroom:  Visualizing, Animating, and Conceptualizing
Linda Stern, Professor of Computer Science, University of Melbourne, Australia

Abstract
The last several years have seen a widespread interest in multimedia animations for helping students understand programs and algorithms.  This is not surprising, given that drawing pictures is a time-honored method to help students understand abstract concepts, and that technology can be used to animate the pictures and enhance their educational potential.  Oddly, despite years of interest in the area, we are still not sure how or why students benefit when this kind of technology is introduced into their learning environment.
Clarity about the educational objectives of the software when designing and using multimedia is one of the most important factors influencing the efficacy of the technology.  We will discuss some of the challenges encountered in designing pedagogically-oriented software from an educational perspective.

Presenter
Linda Stern joined the Department of Computer Science at The University of Melbourne in 1991, where she discovered the rewards of teaching. Since 1998 she has been in charge of the Algorithms in Action project, which has produced software to support the teaching of searching and sorting algorithms.  Her teaching innovations have been recognized with the award of the inaugural Kelvin Medal and of the Dean's Teaching Excellence Award.  Her research interests are in the area of bioinformatics, particularly sequence analysis.

 
 



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