/">Northeastern Region

in cooperation with


The Association for Computing Machinery

Special Interest Group on Computer Science Education

 

presents

 

CCSCNE-2009

THE FOURTEENTH ANNUAL

CONSORTIUM FOR COMPUTING

SCIENCES IN COLLEGES

NORTHEASTERN CONFERENCE

SUNY Plattsburgh

April 24 - 25, 2009

Plattsburgh, NY

Friday, April 24, 2009

REGISTRATION......................................................................... 10:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m.

Angell College Center, Alumni Room

Registration for Programming Contest participants, Hawkins Hall Basement , 7:45 a.m.

Registration for Pre-Conference Workshop Attendees at Workshop Location , 8:50 a.m.

PROGRAMMING CONTEST............................................ 7:45 a.m. 12:45 p.m.

Breakfast and Registration of Team Members and Advisors .... 7:45 a.m. 8:45 a.m., Hawkins Hall basement

Computers Available for Teams to Practice............................. 7:45 a.m. 8:45 a.m., Hawkins Hall, 053B

Initial Meeting and Presentation of the Problems..................... 8:45 a.m. 9:00 a.m., Ward 110

Contest Time....................................................................... 9:00 a.m. Noon, Hawkins 053B & 010

Luncheon for Teams.............................................................. Noon -- 12:45 p.m.


PRE-CONFERENCE WORKSHOPS........................................ 9:00 a.m. noon

 

Workshop 1: Using The Lego Mindstorms NXT Robot Kit In An Introduction To C Programming Class

David Eggert, University of New Haven............................Feinberg 108

/2009/prelimprog_files/eggertWorkshop.pdf">Abstract (PDF)

Workshop 2: Active Learning Exercises for Use in Introductory Programming Courses

Keith Whittington, RIT .................................................. Hawkins 209

/2009/prelimprog_files/whittingtonWorkshop.pdf">Abstract (PDF)

Workshop 3: TeachScheme, ReachJava: Introducing Object-Oriented Programming Without Drowning in Syntax

Stephen Bloch, Adelphi University..................................Feinberg 129

/2009/prelimprog_files/blochWorkshop.pdf">Abstract (PDF)


VENDOR DISPLAYS............................................................... 10:00 a.m.-6:00 p.m.

Angell College Center, Alumni Room

 

WELCOME.................................................................................... 1:00 p.m.-1:15 p.m.

Yokum 200

   Greetings from

John Ettling, President, SUNY Plattsburgh

Conference Chairs -- Lonnie Fairchild, SUNY Plattsburgh, Tim Fossum, SUNY Potsdam


PLENARY SESSION I
.............................................................. 1:15 p.m.-2:15 p.m
.

Yokum 200

 
Unsecuring the Internet: A New Government Policy?

Susan Landau, Sun Microsystems Laboratories

(See abstract and speaker information after the program.)

BREAK.............................................................................................. 2:15 p.m.-2:45 p.m.

Angell College Center


CONCURRENT SESSION 1.................................................... 2:45 p.m.-4:00 p.m.

 Session 1a: Papers - Upper Level Courses

Yokum 203

 

LARC: A Little Architecture for the Classroom

Marc Corliss, Hobart and William Smith Colleges

Wireless Footprints in the WiFI Sandbox

David Rilett, Wentworth Institute of Technology

A Meetings Flow Approach for Conducting Student Final-Year Projects

Chung-Yang Chen, National Central University

Session 1b: Papers: Beginning Programming

Yokum 207

Teaching Programming Using Bricolage

Evelyn Stiller, Plymouth State University

On Self-selected Pairing in CS1: Who Pairs with Whom?

Vincent Cicirello, Richard Stockton College

A Student-Authored Wiki Textbook in CS1

Chris Bennett, University of Maine Farmington

Session 1c - Panel: Mathematics Connections in Computer Science

Yokum 209

Linda Wilkens, Providence College

Ralph Bravaco, Stonehill College

Michael Gousie, Wheaton College

Bo Kim, Daniel Webster College

/2009/prelimprog_files/wilkensPanel.pdf">Abstract (PDF)

Session 1d - Tutorial: K-6 Outreach Using "Computer Science Unplugged"

Yokum 201

Joan Lucas, The College at Brockport, State University of NY

/2009/prelimprog_files/lucasTutorial.pdf">Abstract (PDF)

BREAK...................................................................................................... 4:00 p.m.- 4:45 p.m.

Angell College Center

FACULTY POSTERS SESSION..................................................................... 4:00 p.m.- 4:45 p.m.

Angell College Center, Alumni Room

 

CONCURRENT SESSION 2............................................................... 4:45 p.m.-6:00 p.m.

 

 Session 2a: Papers - Case Studies for CS1 and CS2

Yokum 203

A Simple Encryption Strategy Based on Addition

John Trono, Saint Michael's College

 

TIG: A Utility For Generating Course Web Pages And A Case Study For Teaching Data Structures

Ali Erkan, Ithaca College

Session 2b: Panel: Women in Computer Science: Past, Present and Future Challenges

Yokum 207

Ann Moskol, Lea Bernard, Suzanne Ronayne, Namita Sarawagi, Rhode Island College

Sara Czyzewicz, Olive Interactive, LLC / DandyId.org

/2009/prelimprog_files/moskolPanel.pdf">Abstract (PDF)

Session 2c: Panel: Integrating Data-intensive Scalable Computing into the Computer Science Curriculum

Yokum 209

Mark Hoffman, Quinnipiac University

Alice Fischer, University of New Haven

John Dougherty, Haverford College

Gregory Kesden, Carnegie Mellon University

/2009/prelimprog_files/hoffmanPanel.pdf">Abstract (PDF)

 

Session 2d: Tutorial: The Map-Reduce Programming Model and Hadoop Distributed File System for Use in Undergraduate Curriculum

Yokum 201

Bina Ramamurthy, University at Buffalo

Kumar Madurai

/2009/prelimprog_files/maduraiTutorial.pdf">Abstract (PDF)

 

STUDENT POSTERS...................................................................... 6:00 p.m.-7:00 p.m.

Angell College Center, Cardinal Lounge

SOCIAL HOUR................................................................................. 6:00 p.m.-7:00 p.m.

Angell College Center, Warren Ballrooms

 

BANQUET.......................................................................................... 7:00 p.m.-8:30 p.m.

Angell College Center, Warren Ballroom

Winners of the Programming Contest and Student Poster Session will be announced at the banquet

  Saturday, April 25, 2009

CONTINENTAL BREAKFAST.......................................................7:30 a.m.-8:30 a.m.

Angell College Center

REGISTRATION..............................................................................8:00 a.m.-10:00 a.m.

Angell College Center, Alumni Room

VENDOR DISPLAYS.......................................................................8:00 a.m.-10:30 a.m.

Angell College Center, Alumni Room

 

CONCURRENT SESSION 3............................................................ 8:30 a.m.-9:45 a.m.

 

 Session 3a: Papers - Outreach and Visualization

Yokum 203

 

Joining Computing and the Arts at a Mid-size University

Fred Martin, Gena Greher, Jesse Heines, James Jeffers, Hyun Ju Kim, Sarah Kuhn, Karen Roehr, Nancy Selleck, Linda Silka, Holly Yanco, University of Massachusetts Lowell

 

Artificial Life as a Path from Computing to Philosophy

Drue Coles, Bloomsburg University

 

Seeing Data in Second Life

Jennifer Polack-Wahl, University of Mary Washington

 

Session 3b:  Panel: Discrete Mathematics/Structures: How Do We Deal With the Late Appreciation Problem?

Yokum 207

Ali Erkan, Ithaca College

David Gries, Cornell University

Michael Eckmann, Skidmore College

James Heliotis, Rochester Institute of Technology

/2009/prelimprog_files/erkanPanel.pdf">Abstract (PDF)

 

Session 3c - Tutorial: A Survey of Source Code Management Tools for Programming Courses

Yokum 209

Delbert Hart, SUNY Plattsburgh

/2009/prelimprog_files/hartTutorial.pdf">Abstract (PDF)

 

Session 3d - Tutorial: Test Driven Design in Java for Novice Programmers

Yokum 201

Viera Proulx, Northeastern University

/2009/prelimprog_files/proulxTutorial.pdf">Abstract (PDF)

 

PLENARY SESSION II................................................................ 10:00 a.m.-11:00 a.m.

 

Computational Thinking

Jeannette Wing, Carnegie Mellon University

Yokum 200

 (See abstract and speaker information after the program.)

BREAK............................................................................................ 11:00 a.m.-11:30 a.m.

Angell College Center

 

CONCURRENT SESSION 4........................................................ 11:30 a.m.-12:45 p.m.

 

Session 4a - Papers: Motivating Problems for Non-majors

Yokum 203

 

Collective Bin Packing: An Active Learning Exercise

Vincent Cicirello, Richard Stockton College

 

Labs First: A Computer Scientist's Guide to Teaching Management Information Systems

Eric Breimer, Jami Cotler, Robert Yoder, Siena College

 

Using Games to Introduce Middle School Girls to Computer Science

Tonya Groover, University of Pittsburgh

 

 Session 4b - Panel: Programming Languages Matters

Yokum 207

Richard Wyatt, West Chester University

David Hemmendinger, Union College

Adrian Ionescu, Wagner College

Amruth Kumar, Ramapo College of New Jersey

Lonnie Fairchild, SUNY Plattsburgh

/2009/prelimprog_files/wyattPanel.pdf">Abstract (PDF)

Session 4c - Tutorial: Teaching Security Concepts Using Hands-on and Open Source Products

Yokum 209

Cristian Balan, Champlain College

/2009/prelimprog_files/balanTutorial.pdf">Abstract (PDF)

 

Session 4d - Tutorial: Using Visual Logic (c) to teach Programming Logic in an Introductory CS Course

Yokum 201

Lisa Olivieri, Chestnut Hill College

/2009/prelimprog_files/olivieriTutorial.pdf">Abstract (PDF)

 


LUNCH.......................................................................................... 12:45 p.m. - 1:30 p.m.

Angell College Center, Cardinal Lounge

MEMBERSHIP MEETING..................................................... 1:30 p.m.-2:00 p.m.

Angell College Center, Cardinal Lounge

BOARD MEETING..................................................................... 2:00 p.m.-3:30 p.m.

 

 

 

Information on Plenary Speakers

Unsecuring the Internet: A New Government Policy?

Susan Landau, Sun Microsystems Laboratories

Friday, April 24, 1:15 p.m.-2:15 p.m.

 Abstract:

Over the last half decade the U.S. government has extended wiretapping capabilities through requiring surveillance capabilities be built into Internet voice communications systems and by expanding warrantless wiretapping to any communications where one end was "reasonably believed" to be located outside the U.S. These expansions have been viewed as threats to civil liberties and there has been much public debate about threats to security versus the risks to privacy. But in a world that has both al-Qaeda and Hurricane Katrina, does increased wiretapping capability make us safer? In this talk, we examine security risks created by expanding wiretapping capabilities.

 

Biography:

 

Susan Landau is a Distinguished Engineer at Sun Microsystems Laboratories, where she works on security, cryptography, and policy, including surveillance and digital-rights management issues. Landau had previously been a faculty member at the University of Massachusetts and Wesleyan University, where she worked in algebraic algorithms. She is coauthor, with Whitfield Diffie, of "Privacy on the Line: the Politics of Wiretapping and Encryption" (MIT Press, original edition: 1998; updated and expanded edition: 2007), participant in a 2006 ITAA study on the security risks of applying the Communications Assistance for Law Enforcement Act to VoIP, lead author on the 1994 ACM study, ``Codes, Keys, and Conflicts: Issues in U.S. Crypto Policy,'' and author of numerous computer science and public policy papers. She is currently a member of the editorial board of IEEE Security and Privacy and a section board member of the Communications of the ACM, and moderates the ``researcHers'' list, an international mailing list for women computer science researchers. Landau served for six years as a member of the National Institute of Standards and Technology's Information Security and Privacy Advisory Board. Landau is the recipient of the 2008 Women of Vision Social Impact Award, a AAAS Fellow, and an ACM Distinguished Engineer. She received her BA from Princeton, her MS from Cornell, and her PhD from MIT.

Computational Thinking

Jeannette Wing, Carnegie Mellon University

Saturday, April 25, 10:00 a.m.-11:00 a.m.

Abstract:

My vision for the 21st Century: Computational thinking will be a fundamental skill used by everyone in the world. Just as reading, writing, and arithmetic are fundamental skills every child learns, computational thinking is a skill needed for every citizen to function in today's global society. Computational thinking is an approach to solving problems, building systems, and understanding human behavior that draws on the power and limits of computing. Computational thinking is the use of abstraction to tackle complexity and the use of automation to tackle scale. The combination of the automation of abstraction underlies the enormous capability and reach of computing. In this talk I will argue that computational thinking has already begun to influence many disciplines, from the sciences to the humanities, but that the best is yet to come. Looking to the future, we can anticipate even more profound impact of computational thinking on science, technology, and society: on the ways new discoveries will be made, innovation will occur, and cultures will evolve.

Teaching computational thinking also raises new challenges for education, especially in early grades. While we have models for teaching children mathematics and physics, we do not yet have such models for teaching computational thinking. Moreover, we have the unique opportunity to make most effective use of the computer as a tool to enhance the learning of computational thinking.

In this talk, I will give examples of computational thinking, including ones from our daily lives. It is exciting to imagine the day when computational thinking will be commonplace.

Biography:

 

Dr. Jeannette M. Wing is the President's Professor of Computer Science in the Computer Science Department at Carnegie Mellon University. She received her S.B. and S.M. degrees in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science in 1979 and her Ph.D. degree in Computer Science in 1983, all from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. From 2004-2007, she was Head of the Computer Science Department at Carnegie Mellon. Currently on leave from CMU, she is the Assistant Director of the Computer and Information Science and Engineering Directorate at the National Science Foundation.

Professor Wing's general research interests are in the areas of specification and verification, concurrent and distributed systems, programming languages, and software engineering. Her current focus is on the foundations of trustworthy computing. Professor Wing was or is on the editorial board of eleven journals. She has been a member of many advisory boards, including: the Networking and Information Technology (NITRD) Technical Advisory Group to the President's Council of Advisors on Science and Tecbnology (PCAST), the National Academies of Sciences's Computer Science and Telecommunications Board, ACM Council, the DARPA Information Science and Technology (ISAT) Board, NSF's CISE Advisory Committee, Microsoft's Trustworthy Computing Academic Advisory Board, and the Intel Research Pittsburgh's Advisory Board. She is a member of the Sloan Research Fellowships Program Committee. She is a member of AAAS, ACM, IEEE, Sigma Xi, Phi Beta Kappa, Tau Beta Pi, and Eta Kappa Nu. Professor Wing is an AAAS Fellow, ACM Fellow, and IEEE Fellow.